Five star review for “Mist and Midnight” (Midnight Thirsts Anthology)!

On GoodReads…

This short vampire story immediately draws you in. The witch heroine Charlotte and the hunky hero Pike first see each other at a train station. The chemistry is instantaneous. Yet Charlotte is on the run from a villainous vampire, so she rebuffs Pike, instead intent on making a new safe haven for herself in the small town of Talbot. Yet neither she nor Pike can take their minds off one another, even as the vampire hunting her comes in for the kill.
This story surprised me. I liked that. There are many vampire stories that seem to be carbon copies of one another. I liked that the hero and heroine weren’t afraid to get caught up in the heat of the moment, and that the magic (as in spells) felt real to me. The pacing was great, the sex was hot, and the characters seemed very real and unforced. The story was realistic, in that I could believe in the events taking place, even if they were supernatural in origin. My only problem was I didn’t understand why the vampire was after her (specifically how he had located her in the first place before she arrived in Talbot, and arrived at his desire to possess her), and exactly who he was (I wanted name, age, nationality, and a lot more details). My curiosity is definitely piqued, though! I look forward to more vampire novels from Ms. Ridgewood…soon please? (Tara Fox Hall)

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13500559-midnight-thirsts

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Praise for “Telltale Signs” in Spellbound (Melange Books)

This story is written with the heroine as narrator relating her experiences. (Is that a European thing?) It certainly works for her. The story blended suspense with a snap shot of the likeable heroine and her life. Being alone in the dark is a universal fear for everybody. Your imagination can be your biggest enemy. (Dennis K. Hausker, fiction writer)

John Steiner reviews Spellbound

Some of the best horror and scare is to terrify readers with what they don’t see. This takes careful build up of seemingly mundane events priod to the main setting, and then shape that main event carefully with as much description as a sculpter on a statue. An accumulation of details great and small create a mental map and the reader starts to see where everything is in relation to everything else. They can trace their way back to the front door or point to where the stairs are though they’re out of view at a given moment of the story. Here then you introduce bits and pieces to slowly dial up the audience’s heart rate and put them on the edges of their seats. Tori Ridgewood walks you through all of this and controls the pace of your steps brilliantly. A perfect moodsetter for anyone who enjoys the Halloween [or Hallowe’en] season and likes a little scare every now and then just to feel alive. (John Steiner)

Review of Spellbound 2011

Here’s what the reviewer, Dennis Hausker, had to say about my own contribution to the anthology, Telltale Signs:

This story is written with the heroine as narrator relating her experiences. (Is that a European thing?) It certainly works for her. The story blended suspense with a snap shot of the likeable heroine and her life. Being alone in the dark is a universal fear for everybody. Your imagination can be your biggest enemy.